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Switzerland examines Covid booster jab options

The rate of vaccinations has increased following restrictions on entering indoor public areas in Switzeland. Keystone / Laurent Gillieron

The Swiss medicines regulator is reviewing requests from vaccine producers Pfizer/Biontech and Moderna to use their product for third booster jabs.

This content was published on September 16, 2021 - 17:12
swissinfo.ch/mga

Swissmedic said on ThursdayExternal link that both vaccine makers had submitted their proposals and supporting data last week. Both vaccines are approved for two-dose use in Switzerland on adults and children from the age of 12.

The latest applications requested “a modification of the existing dosage recommendations for their Covid-19 vaccines”.

“Swissmedic is reviewing the submitted clinical data on the third vaccine doses (so-called boosters) for safety and efficacy,” the regulator said.

Coronavirus vaccines used in Switzerland are expected to provide protection for 12 months against all forms of the virus. The Federal Office of Public Health said in June that it did not see the need for booster jabs to be administered before 2022.

The rate of vaccinations in Switzerland has picked up in the last couple of weeks after the government announced restrictions on indoor public spaces for those without a Covid certificate.

Around 53% of the population are fully vaccinated with another 7% having received one jab.

Neighbouring nations – France, Italy, and Germany – have already started providing booster shots to vulnerable groups. Austria plans to do so in October.

The World Health Organisation is opposed to the widespread use of booster shots for healthy people. It would prefer available doses reach poorer nations that have been hit hard by pandemic.


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