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Geneva citizens feel safer from violence and crime

The crime figures in Geneva have returned to the same level as during the 1990s, canton Geneva police said on Tuesday. Keystone

Residents of canton Geneva say they feel much safer compared to three years ago in a survey published by the police on Tuesday. The image of the police among the local population has also improved, the poll found. 

This content was published on June 27, 2017 - 16:30
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According to the 2016 local security survey, 34% of people questioned said they felt unsafe. This compares with half of those who took part in a similar poll in 2013. At that time, one out of every two Geneva residents said they were afraid of leaving their homes after 10pm.

The new poll also reported that people had observed less littering in Geneva, and felt there had been a drop in problems associated with gangs, drug dealing and street fights. 

This overall sense of greater security comes at the same time as falling crime statistics both in Geneva and nationwide. Crime fell by 4% in 2016, with marked drops in the number of recorded homicides, burglaries and thefts around Switzerland.

Since a peak in 2011, crime has fallen every year in Geneva. The most recent statistics reported a 30% fall in criminal cases compared to 2011, mainly due to fewer burglaries and robberies.

The crime figures in Geneva have returned to the same level as during the 1990s, canton Geneva police said on Tuesday.

The image of the police has also improved. Around 70% of those questioned said the force was doing a good job.

In all, 4,852 people took part in the survey, which the cantonal police plan to use to further develop neighbourhood policing strategies.

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