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Federer to be out for ‘many months’ ahead of knee surgery

Roger Federer serves against Hubert Hurkacz in the 2021 Wimbledon quarterfinal on July 7, 2021. Keystone / Aeltc / David Gray / Pool

Swiss tennis star Roger Federer is set to undergo surgery on his right knee for the third time and will be sidelined for many months, missing the upcoming US Open.

This content was published on August 16, 2021 - 11:19
Keystone-SDA/Reuters/swissinfo/sb

In a video posted on Instagram on Sunday, Federer said doctors told him that in order to feel better for the medium- to long-term, he would need surgery on the knee that he injured again during the grass court season.

“I'll be on crutches for many weeks and then also out of the game for many months,” he said.

“It’s going to be difficult of course in some ways but at the same time I know it’s the right thing to do because I want to be healthy and I want to be running around later as well.”

Federer added that the surgery would leave him with “a glimmer of hope” that he can return to competition. But he admitted: “I am realistic – I know how difficult it is at this age right now to do another surgery and try it.”

Federer had knee surgery twice in 2020 which resulted in more than a year of rehabilitation before a return to action in March.

He withdrew from the French Open in June after winning his third-round match to save himself for the grass court season. Federer was knocked out of the Wimbledon quarter-finals at Wimbledon in July by Poland’s Hubert Hurkacz and then missed the Tokyo Olympics.

In the past two years, he has seen his Grand Slam titles tally equaled twice – first by Spain's Rafael Nadal at the 2020 French Open and then by Serbia’s Novak Djokovic, who won his 20th major tournament at Wimbledon 2021.

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